I’m sorry, so sorry…



At least that’s what zdnet UK is saying to Google. Earlier this week it was mentioned that Google was not talking to CNet for a while because of an article in which a CNet reporter disclosed information he found on the CEO of Google, USING google.com a his search engine fount of information.



Well, to avoid incurring the wrath of the giant Google, Zdnet UK has pre-emptively apologized… Among other things they say,

“Acting under the mistaken impression that Google’s search engine was intended to help research public data, we have in the past enthusiastically abused the system to conduct exactly the kind of journalism that Google finds so objectionable.”

They continue…

“Clearly, there is no place in modern reporting for this kind of unregulated, unprotected access to readily available facts, let alone in capriciously using them to illustrate areas of concern. We apologise unreservedly, and will cooperate fully in helping Google change people’s perceptions of its role just as soon as it feels capable of communicating to us how it wishes that role to be seen.”

“Unfortunately, we have been unable to ascertain this. Google UK has told us that we’ll have to talk to Google US to find out whether we too have fallen under the writ of excommunication. As we share all information with our American brethren it is hard to see how it could be any other way, but we humbly await news of our fate.”

One of the funniest Commentaries I’ve seen in quite a while. Frankly I think Google’s decision is childish and I’m disappointed in them for behaving the way they have. They (as much as anyone) should know what a powerful tool their search engine has become and might should have grown a thicker skin. That much said, could they not have tried to have their own personal information removed as they ask us to do if we find something we don’t want revealed on google?

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