Planning for disaster recovery



This covers all operating systems really. What would happen if your hard drive crashed right now? What data would you lose? What about if the server room flooded? What if your mission critical system went down. What data would you lose and how long would it take to be back up and running?


If you’ve asked yourself those questions you’re ahead of the game, most people don’t think about that aspect of computing until it’s too late. That is, until they’ve lost all of this years financial records, or 500 business contacts names and addresses. I’ve talked a bit about doing backups before, but it’s worth revisiting the topic.

To plan for disaster recovery, ask yourself a few things about your backups.
How often are things backed up? (How many days of data could be lost in a worst case scenario?)
Is the backup stored in a different location from the original? (If a fire or other major event affects both is it really a good backup plan for recovering from major problems?
Here’s one that most people may feel uncomfortable with….
Have you tested your backup to verify that it has what you think you’ve backed up?
Not too long ago I ran across a customer that had to rebuild her system from scratch and wanted me to help finish installing programs and restoring from her backups. On one CD was a lonely shortcut where she had dragged the desktop shortcut from the program to the CD. It would be nice if backing up the data was done this way, but it wasn’t. She didn’t have much of anything. The other cd was completely blank.

Test your backups to make sure you have what you expect there. For businesses and those with enough time, I’d try a mock system rebuild to really make sure that everything can be rebuilt from the backup and install media. Think of it as a “fire drill”. Verifying your backups can wind up saving you more time and trouble than it takes to do it.

For that matter, it should be a regular routine to test the integrity of your backups. Media can fail. If you’re using tapes for backups make sure to replace them on a regular basis. Alternate between several backup sets to reduce the possibilities of losing EVERYTHING.

Other things that can be done to plan for disaster recovery are to set aside a folder to keep any downloaded software or driver files specific to a machine. Being organized with this can save you lots of time. With proprietary software, make sure to have all your license key and registration information in one place as well.

You hope it never happens, but being prepared is the best remedy. That way, instead of lamenting the loss of data, you can get back up and running quicker.

Related Posts

Blog Traffic Exchange Related Posts
  • The latest and greatest in Malware Removals I have started referring to malware more and more lately because the term virus doesn't exactly describe the pests I see on peoples machines and the terms spyware or adware aren't doing justice to some of these pests either. (There are many pieces of what I would consider malware that......
  • Ubuntu 6.06 LTS release Probably the biggest news so far today, at least in linux circles is the official release of the Dapper Drake.... Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Long Term Support) (and kubuntu and edubuntu all...). I've been playing with an install based on the Release Candidate (and now upgraded to even include KDE 3.5.3...........
  • HP Vista CLFS.SYS error I've had a fun time this week dealing with a STRANGE Vista problem on an HP computer (I doubt it's HP specific, but don't know for certain.) The error goes like this... "A problem has been detected and Windows has been shut down to prevent damage to your computer." "CLFS.sys"......
Blog Traffic Exchange Related Websites
  • Low Cost Computing for a Baby Boomer Lifestyle I rely heavily on personal computers for work and home activities. So do you. One of my objectives over the past couple of years has been to reduce the cost of computing in the one area where cost-control is easiest: software. I have found many free software applications that work......
  • Retirement Income Planning and Your Financial Advisor Many baby boomers plan for retirement by consulting a financial planner or advisor. A key topic in consultations with an advisor is whether your retirement income will last for as long as you need it to. The answer to this question requires a careful analysis of your assets so as......
  • Data Recovery for Mac   Questions you might have about Data Recovery for Mac Everyone is aware that Macintosh computers are running one of the best operating system today. That's why people seem to go for Mac products. Excellent performance and the good look has made it as a popular item. The first......
PDF24    Send article as PDF   

Similar Posts


See what happened this day in history from either BBC Wikipedia
Search:
Keywords:
Amazon Logo

Comments are closed.


Switch to our mobile site